Agricultural Farming

This map gives you an overview of where the Dust Bowl occured in the U.S.
This map gives you an overview of where the Dust Bowl occured in the U.S.
This image was taken on Black Sunday, April 14, 1935 in Dodge County, Kansas. It shows how bad the Dust Bowl was during this time period.
This image was taken on Black Sunday, April 14, 1935 in Dodge County, Kansas. It shows how bad the Dust Bowl was during this time period.




This is an image of an evicted family and their belongings on their family line road near Tyronza, Arkansas.
This is an image of an evicted family and their belongings on their family line road near Tyronza, Arkansas.


*Agricultural Farming*
Farming was doing just fine before the Great Depression, but then tragedy struck. The crash of the stock market happened. After the crash of 1929, in the early 1930s, prices dropped so low on crops that were being sold, that many farmers went bankrupt and lost their farms. If any farmer was in debt and had to pay back something to the banks, they always had to pay banks back in cash. Some farm families began burning corn than coal in their stoves because corn was cheaper. The price of buying corn was about eight to ten cents a bushel. When prices fell during the great depression, farmers tried to produce even more to pay their debts, taxing and living expenses. Farmers could produce much of their own food while city residents could not. Most farmers bought flour and sugar in 50 pound sacks to make their own bread. Some farm wives made clothing out of cloth from the flour and feed sacks. What contributed to the Great Depression was not only the stock market crash, it was also the great Dust Bowl of the 1930s. The Dust Bowl was a period of severe dust storms causing major ecological and agricultural damage to American and Canadian prarielands. It was caused by severe drought coupled with decades of extensive farming without crop rotation. Since it destroyed a large part of agricultural production, it contributed toward the Great Depression. The storms forced migrant farmers to lose business, livelihood and homes. Families migrated to California or cities to find work. Many ended up homeless or in shantytowns. Franklin D. Roosevelt and the government contributed to help these families by passing a bill. The bill was called the Agricultural Adjustment Act (AAA). It set limits on size of the crops and herd farmers could produce. The farmers that agreed to limit production were paid a subsidy. Most farmers signed up eagerly and soon government checks were flowing into rural mail boxes where the money could help pay bank debts or tax payments.

Amadeo, Kimberly. "The Dust Bowl." About-US Economy. About.com, n.d. Web. 15 Sep 2011. <http://useconomy.about.com/od/criticalssues/p/The_Dust_Bowl.htm>.

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